Reflecting on Research through Journals

Context

With this recipe, students will be able to (a) assess, form opinions, and make judgments about information and/or (b) describe and reflect metacognitively on their research and writing processes, depending its implementation.  Documenting their courses of action and thought will encourage students to engage in an iterative research process, as well as connect with the information they find.  This recipe is applicable to any subject area and can be adapted for almost any assignment that requires research.

Continue reading

Track citations with Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a search tool that allows you to find scholarly books, journal articles, and more across disciplines.  Google Scholar (as well as some other subscription databases) also permits you to track the forward citation trail of a given source, that is to say you can track which more recently published sources cite a given source in their bibliographies.  This recipe describes how to track a citation, and also briefly explores some assignment ideas for integrating this activity.

Track citations with Google Scholar

Context

Google Scholar is a search tool that allows you to find scholarly books, journal articles, and more across disciplines.  Google Scholar (as well as some other subscription databases) also permits you to track the forward citation trail of a given source, that is to say you can track which more recently published sources cite a given source in their bibliographies.  This recipe describes how to track a citation, and also briefly explores some assignment ideas for integrating this activity.

Continue reading

Evaluating information — popular vs. scholarly

Context

This recipe gives students hands-on experience with searching for needed information, understanding the characteristics of different information types (i.e., popular vs. scholarly articles), and the nuances of critically evaluating information.  While written for a psychology course, this recipe could be adapted for a course in most science or social science disciplines.

Continue reading

Evaluating information — popular vs. scholarly

This recipe gives students hands-on experience with searching for needed information, understanding the characteristics of different information types (i.e., popular vs. scholarly articles), and the nuances of critically evaluating information.  While written for a psychology course, this recipe could be adapted for a course in most science or social science disciplines.

Content Editors

Public Group active 1 year, 4 months ago ago

People who help edit and format content

Featured Reviewer

Jen is the Head of Public Outreach and Information Literacy Services in Trexler Library at Muhlenberg College. Jen holds a Master of Library and Information Science and has a background in Psychology and Education as an undergraduate. She works regularly with both faculty and students in areas of information literacy.